Interview with tattoo artist Fluffy Tattoo

Posted by Admin in th-ink on 03 31st, 2022

Fluffy Tattoo creates the cutest mix of floral and animal tattoos we have ever seen! Working at Studio by Sol in Seoul, Korea we chat to the tattoo artist about the inspirations behind her tattoos and how she became and artist…

How long have you been tattooing and how did you become an artist? It will be exactly two years since I started tattooing in June this year. I’ve always liked to draw ever since I was a child. There’s someone who’s always drawing, right? That was me.

As I decided to go to an art university, I started to learn painting with earnest. After entering university I majored in crafts, especially pottery. However, I preferred the process of painting on top of the pottery rather than making it. After graduation, I started to work as a designer while drawing as a pastime, but I felt that it wasn’t for me. I decided to become a tattooist because I wanted to draw again.

What’s your favourite thing about being a tattooer? That people like my drawings. I feel happy that so many people like my style and tattoos. The reactions when I show the results of our tattoo session to my clients makes me feel good .

Can you tell us about your experiences in the tattoo industry? After years of working as a tattooist, I think tattooers are comprehensive artists. Tattooists often have to schedule work, take pictures, edit and market themselves, not just draw pictures.

There have been so many differences between watching the tattoo industry when I was outside of it, and seeing it inside its boundaries. At first, I thought it was difficult because of these differences. I wasn’t used to dealing with customers or taking pictures. But now I think of all this as being part of a tattooist.

How would you describe your work? Every one of my tattoos is a small world in itself. There are stories to be found in my little works. Most of my tattoos are cute or beautiful and I always try to put a special meaning in them. Most people want to express themselves with tattoos or have them contain stories. Customers also give the tattoos I make for them meanings that even I don’t think of.

You’re open to doing cover-up tattoos, can you tell us more about this? I do about four or five cover-up tattoos a month. My customers usually want to cover their existing tattoos with flowers, animals, the moon and clouds. Cover-ups are more difficult than general tattoos. Not only do I need to cover previous work in a natural and beautiful way, but I also have to pay attention to any damage to the skin. They’re just as interesting as the other tattoos I do and I love that my customers are always very satisfied with the new tattoo. I feel very proud of them.

What would you say to someone wanting a cover up tattoo from you? If you want to get a cover-up tattoo, you must read the cover-up precautions beforehand. Since the cover-up isn’t magic you need to consider that the size and colour can’t be as diverse as a regular tattoo can be. This is because tattoo ink cannot put bright colours over dark colours. Plus, the cover-up design should be larger than the existing tattoo. I make an appointment after the customer has thought about these things.

How do you feel covering and updating another tattooer’s work? I’m not conscious of the tattooist who gave my customers existing tattoos. I just focus on the needs of my customers. I see so many people get cover-ups because their tattoos smudge or the previous tattooer has messed up a lot. But, there are some people who cover them because their tastes change. Therefore, I’m open to someone who has been tattooed by me having my work covered by someone else.

What inspires you? Everything around me. Of course, nature is my greatest inspiration, especially as natural things are always around us. The changes in seasons and temperatures, the flowers and animals I’ve seen along the road and new scenery on trips inspire me. 

Can you tell us about the process behind your tattoos? The first thing I do is draw a design and almost every day I upload one on Instagram. So, in fact, even when I’m not working on tattoos, I keep drawing and editing photos to upload. When the design is sold through Instagram the appointment date is set. I then prepare a stencil, guide customers on placement during our consultation and finally tattoo them.

What do you like to tattoo and what would you like to do more of? These days, the combination of animals and flowers is the most interesting to me. These tattoos are small and delicate and they take a lot of time. But, it’s always fun when I’m working on these. I do, however, want to draw and tattoo bigger pieces.

Can you tell us about your own tattoos? Are you a tattoo collector? I have eight tattoos on my body. Three small doodle tattoos, three plant tattoos, a goldfish tattoo and my cat tattoo. Two of them were given to me by my tattoo teacher, Soltattoo. After I got a few tattoos on my body, the style I wanted became clear. But I don’t think I have enough to say I’m a tattoo collector maybe after another two or three tattoos.

How does it feel making tattoos in Korea when they’re still illegal? I always feel like I’m carrying a certain amount of anxiety. Before I became a tattooist, I hesitated because it was illegal. That’s why I’m always cautious. Now I’m used to the anxiety, but I hope it becomes legal soon so that both tattooists and customers can get tattoos safely.

How are tattoo artists seen by society?There are still two points of view. Contrary to the positive perspective of people who enjoy tattoo culture, there is a conservative and disgusting view of tattoos. As a person engaged in tattoo culture, I am still surprised when I encounter people who feel disgust for tattoos, especially while I’m surrounded by people who love tattoos. Most of the older generations still regard tattoos as a symbol of negative attitudes, which is why tattoos are not legalised in Korea.

Despite all of this what moment in your career are you most proud of? I’m proud every time that people love my tattoos. I’m glad that I do this job whenever I receive good reviews from customers after tattooing.

Make sure to follow @fluffy_tattoo on Instagram for more adorable tattoos.



Neo-Traditional Stag Thigh Tattoo

Posted by Admin in tattoo ideas on 03 30th, 2022
Stag Thigh Tattoo

Stag thigh tattoo by neo-traditional artist Robin Kemper, done at Greyhound Tattoo in Essen, Germany.

The post Neo-Traditional Stag Thigh Tattoo first appeared on Best Tattoo Ideas For Men & Women.



Interview with tattoo artist Eunyu

Posted by Admin in th-ink on 03 29th, 2022

Tattoo artist Eunyu runs her own private tattoo studio in Seoul, Korea. In this post she tells us all about her journey to becoming the artist she is today, how she lives her life through art and her beautifully delicate tattoos…

What inspired you to become a tattoo artist and how did you become one? I have always had a desire to become an artist. After graduating from college, I decided that realistically it would be difficult to become an artist that only painted as a profession. So, I became an ordinary office worker.

After about a year, I realised that I didn’t want to give up painting. At that time, a friend of mine who was a tattooist, told me I should learn to tattoo. Fortunately, tattooing as a job suited me really well. I became a disciple of Sol Tattoo. A tattooer and shop that are famous in Korea for their delicate tattoos. I learnt tattoo techniques which matched with my delicate and small drawings.

Do you have a background in art? I have been drawing since I was very young. After graduating from a specialised art high school, I entered an art college. I majored in oriental painting, but I also studied various art fields such as photography, design and Western painting.

I usually go to lots of exhibitions, read art magazines and try to live a life very closely related to art.

Can you tell us about your experiences in the tattoo industry? I think the most attractive part of being a tattoo artist is the ability to build a special relationship with your customers. If people like my small drawings they buy them and by doing so they show that they like my style. A lot of my clients ask me to design them something that is unique. I find it really rewarding to communicate with and tattoo people who need my drawing talent and tattoo skills.

By creating a custom design I get to hear the special story of the person I will be tattoing. The client trusts me and I’m very proud of this. That’s why I want to talk to more of my customers and do custom pieces in the future.

How would you describe your work? I explore the little things that can be found in nature and I delicately draw them with love. Bright colours and an array of colours are represented in my work. Although they are small in size, the details are delicate and require a lot more effort than expected.

Do you prefer to do colour or black and grey tattoos? I like both. But I like to deal with a wide range of colours, which makes colour work more fun. In the beginning of my tattoo career I did a lot of black and grey work. But as clients prefer my colour work, I’ve
been doing it more. Lately, I’ve been working on just black tattoos though.

Can you tell us about the process behind your tattoos? I often use photos that I have taken myself. In these photos of nature I find a lot of colours that inspire me. I try to create natural compositions as much as possible by pursuing the reality of nature’s form rather than deviating from the original.

I tend to choose the final design after I have tried lots of different ways of doing it. I respect my customer’s choice so I prepare several commissioned designs for them to choose from.

What inspires you? I like nature, shiny things and cute little animals. I especially like a smooth flowing shape which is often found in nature. As such, most of my designs are inspired by nature. Soft and saturated colours are my favourites too, so I like flowers and colourful birds.

I also like beautiful stories like fairy tales. I get ideas from song lyrics and use my imagination to make existing objects more beautiful.

You tattoo a lot of fish. Why do you think this is? The fish I draw have a transparent smooth flowing tail. The design sits beautifully on the skin as a tattoo, like a real fish swimming freely.

There is beauty in the curves and the red colour goes well with my customer’s skin tones. It all comes together to give people a soft and fluid feel. That’s why a lot of people seem to like my fish tattoos.

What do you like to tattoo and what would you like to do more of? I like to draw creatures that change shape such as fish, jellyfish, and birds. This is also because I can then present various designs to my customers.

In the future, I want to work on big designs, so that the flowers change according to the shape of the body. For example, I want to create a tattoo in the form of a large wrap around plant that stretches freely over the body, such as morning glory or a sweet pea flower.

Can you tell us about your own tattoos? Are you a tattoo collector? I have about 10 tattoos, most of them are flowers and plants. I also have my lovely cat tattoo. I don’t have any very large tattoos yet, for my next tattoo I want a big beautiful flower on my back.

What’s the tattoo scene like where you are? The tattoo scene in Korea is developing at an incredibly fast pace. Watercolour style tattoos that are very delicate or use a variety of colours are sometimes called Korean style. Because there are so many talented and great tattooists a lot of people come to Korea to get tattooed from around the world.

However, society isn’t keeping up with the popularity of tattooing. Tattoos are still illegal in Korea, so tattooists and citizens are voicing that legalisation should proceed for a larger tattoo market in the future.

What moment in your career are you most proud of? The proudest moment is, of course, when my customers show satisfaction with the tattoo I have done. People who ask me for a custom design often tell me very personal stories that are melancholic and sad. They often say that they are comforted by the tattoo designs I make and that they are happy. When I hear this I feel that I did really well in becoming a tattooist.

There are people who express it in words at the appointment, but there are also people who quietly send me a picture of my tattoos completely healed and a message of sincerity. This makes me really happy.

Follow @eunyu_tattoo (if you don’t already) for more wonderful nature-inspired tattoos.



Weekly r/Tattoos Question/FreeTalk Thread! – March 26, 2022

Posted by Admin in reddit on 03 26th, 2022

It's question time!


Part of our subreddit's recent transformation includes a new weekly discussion thread! Ask any question you'd like, and people from our community will give you their most honest opinions/answers. Please remember that most usual rules apply.

Important rules:


  • No aftercare/medical questions/advice

  • No pricing questions/advice

  • Please be kind to your fellow tattoo-lovers, and follow reddiquette

Some examples of things to ask the community about:


  • Tattoo placement

  • Skin tone

  • Tattoo subject/style/design

  • Recommended tattoo artists in your area

  • Pain

  • Anything else you'd like!

If you're asking about your tattoo, please provide an image of the stencil or final tattoo, rather than elaborately describing it in a paragraph. Also, remember that unless a user has a verified flair, their advice may not be coming from a history of tattooing.

submitted by /u/esoterix_luke
[link] [comments]



Watercolor Camellias

Posted by Admin in tattoo ideas on 03 26th, 2022
Camellias Tattoo

Watercolor Camellias by Yuki Zerkjad, done at Exp Haus in London, UK

The post Watercolor Camellias first appeared on Best Tattoo Ideas For Men & Women.



A garden on the body: interview with Tilda Kim

Posted by Admin in th-ink on 03 24th, 2022

Sunyoung Kim (Tilda Kim) or as you might know her @tilda_tattoo creates beautiful intricate tattoos at Studio by Sol in Seoul, Korea. We chat to this flower obsessed tattoo artist about her journey into the tattoo world and of course, flowers…

What inspired you to become a tattoo artist and how did you become one? When I was in my third year of college, I saw (my now) tattoo teacher, Sol’s fineline tattoos for the first time. I was so surprised by them as he recreated my favourite paintings by Van Gogh and Monet beautifully with tattoos. I was shocked that a tattoo could be so small and delicate in such a pretty way.

Before that I had only seen black work and bold lines. I was surprised at how many colours could be used in tattoos. I thought tattoo ink was only black, red or blue with a high saturation. I like to use lots of colours when I draw, so this style of tattooing was so attractive to me and I loved that there were so many colourful tattoo inks.

When I was in college, I had a chance to learn how to tattoo, but I hesitated because of the conservative perceptions around me. After graduation, I worked as a fashion MD for about a year, but it didn’t suit my aptitude, the fast pace exhausted me. I wondered what kind of work I could do that was a better way of promoting my own style and drawings to other people. I remembered my college days when I was interested in tattoos. From then on I wanted to learn how to tattoo.

Do you have a background in art? From the age of 17, I studied painting to enter an art college and I then attended an art college for four years.

Can you tell us about your experiences in the tattoo industry? Tattoos are pictures that remain on the skin for life. Therefore, I have a sense of responsibility to my customers. This is the biggest experience and the most important point of view I’ve had since I started learning about tattooing. 

How would you describe your work? I have a so-called “fineline” style of tattooing which consists of using small and delicate lines. My tattoos feature a variety of natural materials such as flowers, birds and butterflies in various colours.

You specialise in flower tattoos, what do you love about them? The reason why I usually tattoo things such as flowers and butterflies is that these natural objects look even more natural when they are on a person’s body. I think the most attractive thing is the bright and vivid colours of the flowers and their harmonious appearance as they flow along the curve of the body.

I also create a lot of bouquets of flowers which are made up of the person’s birth flowers. In Korea, many people want to immortalise their family’s birth flowers as tattoos. I think these tattoos show that the flowers can never die as they’re alive on the body. To me these look like small flower gardens too.

Do you prefer to do colour or black and grey tattoos? I prefer colour work, but I also like black tattoos. I think black tattoos are a more attractive option when an artist is expressing the feeling of a pencil drawing.

Can you tell us about the process behind your tattoos? When I draw tattoo designs I look for images a lot, then I try to synthesise various ingredients. These include encounters I have had with butterflies, famous paintings and flowers. Sometimes I can create a good design from items and places I didn’t expect to.

Are there any challenges you face when doing tiny tattoos? These are a little tricky because I have to hold my breath and concentrate when tattooing animal’s features.

What inspires you? In particular the memories I have of drawing fashion illustrations have helped me a lot in tattooing. When I drew clothes, I liked to draw checked patterns, lace, tweeds, flowers, etc. My past life as a designer is very helpful when I’m drawing tattoo designs, as I am expressing various materials and combining colours.

Also colour and texture are a very important part of flowers, I’m sure there are no boundaries between different types of art. I refer to Pinterest or Google when I draw designs, sometimes I get inspired by vintage botanical art books and classic movies.

What do you like to tattoo and what would you like to do more of? I like drawing roses the best. I like the variety found in a rose’s appearance, from rose buds to full bloom, and roses have various colours. Also I love that roses bloom in their prettiest form in the hottest days of summer.

I like creating small and large tattoos alike. In particular, I think flower tattoos or plant tattoos are wonderful to tattoo as if they are blooming along the curve of the body. Someday I want to try to make a flower tattoo that makes it look like someone’s entire arm or leg is wrapped like a vine.

Can you tell us about your own tattoos? Are you a tattoo collector? I like flowers, natural objects and famous paintings, so I have these tattooed on my body. My favourite tattoo is Monet’s Water Lilies done by my teacher, Tattooist Sol. This was my first tattoo, Monet’s beautiful blue and purple colours have remained clear even after two years.

What’s the tattoo scene like where you are? As tattoos are illegal in Korea, tattoos seem to have more negative views associated with them. In particular, many women in Korea like small-sized tattoos because they are not noticeable and they can use tattoos like fashion accessories. I hope tattoos become legal as soon as possible so that everyone can confidently enjoy tattoos of various genres.

What moment in your career are you most proud of? I feel so happy and proud when my clients constantly visit me and are satisfied with my work.

Follow @tilda_tattoo (if you don’t already) for more incredibly beautiful tattoos.



Interview with tattoo artist Dami Nam

Posted by Admin in th-ink on 03 21st, 2022

Dami Nam or as you might know her @daldam__, runs Soda Shop in Itaewon, Seoul, Korea. We chat to the colour tattoo artist about her tattoos, inspiration behind her painting-like designs and the tattoo education programme she hosts…

What inspired you to become a tattoo artist and how did you become one? I’ve always enjoyed drawing ever since I was a child.  I wanted to get a job in an art-related field when I became an adult as I was so interested in painting. I had studied painting for a long time, but I worked at a “regular” company for a while for the stability it offered. However, when I realised I couldn’t draw anymore I became depressed, which led me to search for a way to keep drawing as a professional. I started tattooing after a friend of a tattoo artist I ad grown up with advised me to.

Can you tell us about your experiences in the tattoo industry? I’ve been tattooing for six years and I run a soda shop in Itaewon, Seoul. I also work as a mentor, educating trainees who want to learn my tattoo techniques. 

Can you tell us more about your tattoo education? I had a lot of people asking about tattoo related classes so I started my tattoo education by chance. I’ve now established a stable apprenticeship system.

Using each apprentice’s unique personality, I teach them the skills required for tattoo work and educate them on how to turn their ideas into wonderful tattoo designs. In addition, my apprentices are thoroughly educated in the hygienic aspects of tattooing, such as infection prevention. Also if they develop their skills to a good level they can work at my shop. 

How would you describe your work? I mainly express oriental paintings through tattoos. Most of all I like to match flowers and animals to traditional accessories using bright colours. I also tattoo detailed landscapes with a thin line background. I believe the charm of my work is the glorious feeling felt when I express various landscapes in small tattoos.

Are there any challenges you face when doing tiny tattoos? There are moments when I design small parts, such as an eye where I experience a slight hand tremor. This makes me nervous, but I take a deep breath and work with a calm mind to draw the pupil in the right place.

Have you always tattooed like you do now? No. I learnt to tattoo by myself without a teacher, so there was a lot of trial and error at first due to my lack of tattoo skills.

Since then I have researched and developed various tattoo techniques. When I did run into problems while working I sought advice from seniors with more experience than me.

Can you tell us about the process behind your tattoos? In my daily life an idea will suddenly come to my mind. There are moments when I think, “Oh, this design would be lovely.” I write it down on my smartphone’s notepad so I don’t forget it.

My tattoo work is similar to that of other tattoo artists, as I design with care and work using transfer paper. If there’s one thing I’m particularly concerned about, I try to make sure that every detail is moved to the skin when I’m tracing the design.

What inspires you? Traditional Korean elements have had the most significant influence on my tattoo work. I like the beauty of the old things, from the beautiful colours to paintings with traditional beauty as well as traditional decorations that are not used in modern times. Aside from that, the scenery I see and a beautiful scene from a movie can be sources for my tattoo work.

What do you like to tattoo and what would you like to do more of? It’s a lot of fun for me to work on tattoo pieces with different colours. I love to recreate the beautiful scenes of oriental paintings and movies through tattoos. I’m also interested in traditional accessories these days, so I’m trying to develop my work by making those accessories into tattoo designs. Also, I want to be a good mentor to my students.

Do you prefer to do colour or black and grey tattoos? It’s difficult for me to choose between the two techniques as they’re attractive in different ways. Colour tattoos, in my opinion, are excellent because they allow me to create artworks by combining different colours, while black tattoos are appealing because they make it possible to express objects by using calm contrasts.

Can you tell us about your own tattoos? Are you a tattoo collector? There isn’t a tattoo artist out there who doesn’t collect tattoos. I’m a big fan of getting tattoos and I have a lot. I particularly enjoy getting flowers in gentle colours. Ornament style tattoos are very fashionable these days. So I’m thinking about getting another pretty tattoo.

What’s the tattoo scene like where you are? I work in Itaewon, Seoul which is Korea’s capital, it’s an area with a high concentration of foreigners. There are a lot of tattoo artists here who do fantastic work.

To remain active and not fall behind in the tattoo world, I believe it is critical to accurately understand your customers’ needs. To maintain my unique style I also strive to create tattoo works that meet all these requirements.

How have you been affected by the pandemic? In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic my tattoo shop was significantly affected as foreign customers accounted for about half of the total number of customers in my shop. Also, as the COVID-19-related quarantine policy was implemented in Korea, there were various restrictions on the shop’s operation, so I also had business difficulties. However, my shop’s business situation has dramatically improved since the “With Corona” policy was implemented.

When and how did you open your tattoo shop? Originally I was running a tattoo studio with other tattoo artists, but since we were running it together it was difficult to carry out what we all wanted. So I decided to open my own tattoo studio three years ago and that’s when soda shop was made.

What is the shop like including the other artists? Soda shop has a bright and free vibe and consists of female tattoo artists only. We didn’t intend it but somehow we just got together. We’re all close and always supporting each other’s work too.

What moment in your career are you most proud of? I am proud when my customers are pleased with their tattoo, when I am satisfied with my work or when my students create outstanding tattoos.

Follow @daldam__ (if you don’t already) for more incredibly beautiful tattoos.



Breaking Your Mask

Posted by Admin in tattoo ideas on 03 21st, 2022
Breaking Your Mask

Breaking Your Mask by Yesy Tattoo at Blessed Tattoo Studio in Houston, Texas.

The post Breaking Your Mask first appeared on Best Tattoo Ideas For Men & Women.



Weekly r/Tattoos Question/FreeTalk Thread! – March 19, 2022

Posted by Admin in reddit on 03 19th, 2022

It's question time!


Part of our subreddit's recent transformation includes a new weekly discussion thread! Ask any question you'd like, and people from our community will give you their most honest opinions/answers. Please remember that most usual rules apply.

Important rules:


  • No aftercare/medical questions/advice

  • No pricing questions/advice

  • Please be kind to your fellow tattoo-lovers, and follow reddiquette

Some examples of things to ask the community about:


  • Tattoo placement

  • Skin tone

  • Tattoo subject/style/design

  • Recommended tattoo artists in your area

  • Pain

  • Anything else you'd like!

If you're asking about your tattoo, please provide an image of the stencil or final tattoo, rather than elaborately describing it in a paragraph. Also, remember that unless a user has a verified flair, their advice may not be coming from a history of tattooing.

submitted by /u/esoterix_luke
[link] [comments]



Human animals: Shani Nizan

Posted by Admin in th-ink on 03 18th, 2022

Tattoo artist Shani Nizan is known for her human animals which she creates in New York at Inked NYC. We chat to the tattooist about the inspirations behind her recognisable artwork…

What inspired you to become a tattoo artist and how did you become an artist? I have been drawing ever since I can remember. When I was younger I would draw every day for four hours. In the afternoon my mother would sit me and my sisters on the living room carpet for creative time. Thinking back that must have had some influence on me. 

I would say that my formal entry into the art world was actually in physics class, when I couldn’t focus I would draw my teacher, Efraim, who had unique facial features.

During my mandatory military service, when I was bored, I would draw on my arms. I then shared these on social media and loved the reactions and attention I’d get. People would approach me and asked to get inked as they thought they were actual tattoos.

Shortly after getting released from the army I knew I had to explore my options as a tattoo artist. After a while, I realised that tattooing made me “even cooler” than I was before, but more importantly I had the opportunity to meet a lot of new people and connect with them on a deeper level. So I am really glad life led me that way.

How would you describe your work? “Very specific” is the first thing I would say to someone that asks this question. Then I would add that I am always combining human bodies with animal heads. My style is semi-realistic mixed with naive drawing that I believe is inspired by old time children’s books.

How did you come up with your human animals? I was drawing them separately at first – animals because it was good practice and people because I was curious to draw my friends. One day I showed my drawings to my great aunt Galia, as her opinion matters to me a lot and she said “you copy well.” 

After feeling down for a few days I saw a video called “everything is a remix” which showed me how some great pieces of art were a combination of two already-m existing things. I tried to do the same and mix two of my interests, since then, it’s been hard to draw anything else. I can’t stop!

The first one I did in July 2017, I called her “Lady Linda” and I tattooed her on my thigh. I have tried and still try to develop as an artist and do other things, but they’re still what I like to create the most. 

They’re so different, some of my clients will use this hybrid to give their pet a human personality that they always had, some will use the animal head as a mask to hide with or as a metaphor for themselves. 

What attracted you to black and grey tattooing? Before I even started tattooing I never used colour. I would draw mostly “by the way” as I call it, carrying with me a small sketch book and a pen.

When I started tattooing it felt unnatural to use colour. I also imagined it wouldn’t be comfortable to carry so many ink bottles around when touring and traveling. 

Have you always tattooed like you do now? When I started tattooing I was doing lots of different styles so I could learn different techniques. Pretty early on I realised I didn’t think it was necessary and I started tattooing only my own art that was pretty similar to what it is now.

Of course like every artist I got better, developed and matured (hopefully). I found it hard to stop creating something that I liked so much, like my creatures. In my opinion, to force a young tattoo artist to learn all of the techniques is like teaching a guitar player to play every kind of music in the world. 

Can you tell us about the process behind your tattoos? Usually, I will wait to meet the client in person so we can work on the sketch together. Sometimes I prepare something beforehand but I’m never disappointed when I realise we need to start over.

The connection between me and the client as we build a sketch together is the most important part for me. That’s the moment when we both can feel that it’s not just a logistical process but an experience that means something. 

Sometimes people can be surprised or feel stressed when they come to get inked without having seen a design, but I think that that’s the magical part of tattooing.

What inspires you? I have problems remembering new things nowadays and I think the reason is that my memory storage is at full capacity. My mind is filled with children’s songs, tapes and memories I have from childhood.

In general I am fascinated by the imagination of children which is usually boundless, honest, creative and lively. These qualities can be seen in my drawings, in my youthful behaviour and by the fact that I am writing a children’s book.

I’m not sure how it comes to play a part but I think what inspires me the most though is music. I’ve always been drawn to music and most of my friends are musicians. I get inspired by documentaries about musicians I admire and in order to get myself working I need my music playing. My clients can testify that the one thing they need to endure, beside the pain, is listening to me sing throughout the session!

What do you like to tattoo and what would you like to do more of?  Lately I’ve started performing free hand abstract tattoos, that complement the body and hopefully make the client like the tattooed area more than before.

It takes time to start being known for a new niche but I hope to start creating more of these tattoos soon.

Can you tell us about your experiences in the tattoo industry? I am always experiencing three different parts of the tattoo industry. The one in Israel where I was born and started working so it always feels like home. The one in Europe where I was travelling from studio to studio between cities and countries and met amazing artists that are great inspirations. Lastly the one in New York where I feel like the industry is the most “industrial”, in the most positive way. At Inked I get the best treatment an artist can ask for from a studio.

What moment in your career are you most proud of?  Without a doubt the moment I got an email from Julia Rehme inviting me to be a resident in her studio in Berlin. I had less than one year’s worth of experience back then and even though I was arrogant to perform my art and my art only, I was doubting myself a lot on the inside.

Being invited to work with Julia opened the most important doors in my career and I’ll forever be thankful to her for that! 

Can you tell us about your own tattoos? Are you a tattoo collector? I don’t have a lot of tattoos, just a few pieces that I got from my friends and colleagues. My favourite one is a flower on my back done by a friend that I taught how to tattoo about a year ago. @Amita__________ got so amazing so fast that I wanted to give her a big canvas to work on.

Make sure to follow Shani on Instagram for more tattoos and travel updates.












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If you are looking for high quality tattoo designs, then this is the place. Check the growing database of thousands of ideas. Choose from Tribal Tattoos, Arm Band Tattoos, Belly Button Tattoos, Butterfly Tattoos, Cartoon Tattoos, Cat Tattoos, Celtic Tattoos, Chinese Tattoos, Cross Tattoos, Devil Tattoos, Marmaid Tattoos, Dragon Tattoos, Eagle Tattoos, Fairy Tattoos, Fantasy Tattoos, Fish Tattoos, Flower Tattoos, Zodiac Tattoos, Harley Tattoos, Heart Tattoos, Insect Tattoos, Japanese Symbol Tattoos, Lizard Tattoos, Lower Back Tattoos, Angel Tattoos, Abstract Tattoos, Animal Tattoos, Monkey Tattoos, Monster Tattoos, Religious Tattoos, Patriotic Tattoos, Women Tattoos, Rose Tattoos, Skull Tattoos, Snake Tattoos, Sport Tattoos, Star Tattoos, Sun Tattoos, Symbol Tattoos, Tiger Tattoos, Celebrity Tattoos, and much more. Find that perfect tattoo to print out and take to your favorite tattoo artist.  

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